Ogden Cami
 

I had my eye on the Ogden Cami when Kelli released the pattern last year, but I wasn’t urged to a make it until participating in Me Made May this year and realized I’m sorely lacking in tank tops. The Summer of Basics sew-along is a great way to fill those wardrobe gaps (I may need to do one of these for the fall!) and this cami is my first finished project for the sew-along.

 

Ogden Cami
 

After recently organizing my stash and “discovering” a length of gold metallic linen I bought a few years ago to make, yes, a camisole, I committed to sewing it up right away for this summer. I love the sheen and how it catches the light! It does wrinkle quite a bit, as is the nature of linen, but it adds to the overall casual style of the cami.

 

Ogden Cami
 

The cami went together in a snap, nothing like cutting out and making a project to wear out to dinner later that night.  Sew up the sides, make the straps, attach the straps, sew on the facing, sew the hem – boom, done.  I like the fact that the neckline is finished with a long facing that won’t flip out, and the way the straps are sewn in is pretty smart.  After attaching the straps to the front I tried on the tank with the straps pinned to the back to check the length and the straps were spot-on.  Honestly, I wouldn’t change a thing with this pattern and plan on making more for my wardrobe.  This would be a good stash busting project!

 

Maritime Shorts
 

These shorts aren’t part of my Summer of Basics plan, and I actually made them last year, but I never blogged them and thought they looked cute with the Ogden Cami.  These are my first pair of Maritime Shorts and they are so.  Stinking.  Perfect.  I still haven’t had luck with sewing pants, but these shorts are 100% a perfect fit on me and there wasn’t a single thing I needed to change.  Wowzers.  I wore these to death last summer and they’re on heavy rotation right now, with another pair cut out and ready to go on my sewing table.

 

Maritime Shorts
 

I used a cotton sateen that I found last year at Fabric Place Basement, it’s a BCBG border print-type fabric that I played around with, trying to maximize as much of the printed portion versus the solid of the fabric. Because of the print, I opted for no back pockets but definitely will use back pockets on my future versions. I need a whole assortment of these for the summer, they’re so much nicer and a better fit than my J Crew chino shorts.

 

Maritime Shorts
 

The rise on these shorts is also nice, it’s a mid-rise that keeps everything contained, if you know what I mean.  Not shown in any of the photos I took, but I used a bicycle-printed coral fabric for the inner waistband and pocket lining. It’s kinda wacky, but I find it fun and amusing when there’s little surprises like that inside garments. I’m using seahorses on the inside of my next pair!

 

Ogden Cami
 

Patterns: Ogden Cami by True Bias, Maritime Shorts by Grainline Studio
Fabrics: Cami – metallic linen; Shorts – cotton sateen; both from Fabric Place Basement

 

This post is part of the Indiesew Blogger Network – pattern or fabric may have been provided by Indiesew, however all thoughts and opinions are my own

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Untitled
 

I just spent the last week at home with my family in PA – lots of games were played, laps run at the park and swam at the pool, playtime with my niece, and of course – fabric shopping out in Lancaster County. I’m bringing home a pretty good haul from some shops we stopped at and my Bernina is now purring like a kitten after being serviced. Plus, I got some old patterns and from my Mom, including a vintage funnel-neck shift dress pattern from the 60’s.  Good times at home, sad to leave!

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Vogue 9192
 

2017 is the year of the one-piece bathing suit for me.

To be quite honest, I’m over the teeny triangle bikini tops and swim bottoms that you need to hold onto when a big wave breaks in the ocean.  Maybe it’s that I’m older now and I just want to be comfortable in a fuss-free swimsuit at the beach and pool.

In preparation for our Florida vacation at the beginning of June, I started scouring the internet looking for one-piece swimsuits and had a hard time finding anything that wasn’t too frumpy or mumsy looking.  I ended up buying one from J.Crew that’s pretty cute, but it still wasn’t fitting the bill of what I wanted: a low back, some kind of print or pattern that looked slimming, and something “helpful” in the bust area that I’m severely lacking.  Fortunately, Vogue 9192 checks off just about all of those boxes.

 

Vogue 9192
 

This is an awesome pattern (I want to make the other one-piece from this pattern) but the fabric is really what’s making the suit – a border print with variegated stripes on both ends and black in the middle, found in a swimsuit remnant bin at Fabric Place Basement.  Playing around with the pattern placement, I placed the bodice pieces on the fabric so that the stripes ended right where the V stops and cut the bottom portion of the suit out of the solid black part of the spandex.  That way, the stripes would draw more attention upward, with some of the larger stripes going across the bust, and the bottom part of the suit in black would have a slimming effect.  My stripe placement isn’t perfect at the side seams, which you’ll see in other photos, but I’m pleased as punch with how the stripes match across the front and back bodice pieces!

 

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(I got the worst sunburn on my chest the very first day, no way to color-correct that in Photoshop!  That’s what I get for not reapplying in time!)

 

Obviously, this is a verrrrrrry low cut swimsuit in the front (and the back) and I was worried that it might not be, ahem, that secure when I wore it in the pool.  To be quite honest, I felt really comfortable and confident wearing it and would be more concerned if I had a larger bust that something might slip!  The straps across the middle are designed to anchor everything in place across the two cups; I eliminated one of them since the second one seemed too long for me and bunched up in the middle, guess I didn’t need that extra security.  I also added in some small swim cups for modesty between the lining and the outer fabric and tacked them to the lining, an exercise that took quite a lot of fussing to get the cup placement just right.

 

Vogue 9192
 

If there’s one thing I’d change about this swimsuit, if I was to make it again, it would be the order of construction when turning the seam allowances with the elastic and attaching the straps etc.  It’s very “homemade” to turn and sew the elastic, and then go back over the original stitching to attach the shoulder straps and front bodice strap.  Fortunately with black fabric and black thread it’s not noticeable, but it would have been with a lighter colored fabric.  I believe the directions are written this way because it makes it easier to construct the suit, but if you’re really looking for a professional finish, it would be best to try to do everything in one step with one line of stitching.  Just nit-picking, but it’s something I wish I thought of earlier on when I was sewing.

This design is right on-trend and exactly what I was looking for in a one-piece swimsuit pattern – c’mon Vogue, give us some more!

 

Vogue 9192
 

Pattern: Vogue 9192, View B
Fabric: spandex remnant from Fabric Place Basement

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Minttu Tank
 

What’s more perfect for summer than a swingy, loose-fitting tank? The Minttu is one of those sewing patterns that I knew I needed to make for hot, humid days the instant I saw Named Patterns new collection.

The fabric I used is a gorgeous rayon jersey from Britex that I bought on a work trip to San Francisco last summer. My original intent was to save it for some kind of summery top, but I had no idea what pattern to use for it when I brought it home from my trip.  I’m so glad I saved it until this summer!

 

Minttu Tank
 

The construction is super-simple until you get to the all-in-one facing.  I kept staring at the instructions, trying to interpret what I was supposed to do, but it was Allie’s video on the Indiesew blog that saved the day and made it crystal-clear how to sew the facing in.  It’s a pretty genius construction method once you get the general idea of how it’s to be done.

I skipped the interfacing that the pattern calls for – maybe I haven’t found the right knit interfacing, but I never seem to have luck with it stretching with my knit fabrics when I use it.  It’s fine not having the interfacing around the neckline, but it’s around the armholes that I would have benefitted from some kind of stabilizer.  The rayon is really stretchy and the armhole facings roll out a bit, even with the understitching.  It would also help to prevent the armholes drooping down a bit around the underarm.  To be fair, this may have been too drapey of a fabric to use with the pattern, but I didn’t care!

 

Minttu Tank
 

My only minor complaint with this tank is that I can’t wear a normal bra with it – I needed to push my straps in so they wouldn’t be visible, but they always seemed to peek out during the day.  In these photos I’m wearing a strapless, but it’s kind of annoying to be honest.  I think I’m going to try out those clips that convert your regular bra into a racer back bra and see how that goes.

 

Minttu Tank
 

This tank is so great – you can eat a big lunch and no one will know!  The amount of fabric isn’t overwhelming in that you feel shapeless wearing it either, especially with the fitted nature of the tank at the bust.  But I bet this would make a good maternity tank too, lol!  The first time I wore this I paired it with skinny jeans, but I like it best with shorts, something about the mixed proportions looks good to me.

Pattern: Minttu Tank by Named Patterns
Fabric: rayon knit from Britex
Shorts: Old Navy
Sunnies: Tommy Hilfiger

This post is part of the Indiesew Blogger Network – pattern or fabric may have been provided by Indiesew, however all thoughts and opinions are my own

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Fabric swatch books
 

My current fabric storage is less than ideal – I have two giant plastic tubs shoved in my tiny walk-in bedroom closet that I share with my husband.  The closet is super dark, the tubs are stacked on top of each other, and are both ridiculously heavy and hard to pull out of the closet when I want to take a look at something.  At least they’re see-through, but it’s still hard to figure out what’s in there.

Well, it was driving me nuts that I wasn’t 100% sure of what fabric I had, or what yardage I bought of something, and I needed a new way to keep track of the fabric I owned – especially when it comes to planning new sewing projects.  I’m also guilty of thinking I don’t have a type of fabric for a project, and then come to realize after buying new fabric that yes, I already have fabric in my stash that would have worked!

The solution – a portable catalog of fabric swatch cards (you can download the file to make your own here!).

 

Fabric swatch book
 

After going through both fabric bins, I consolidated all of my full cuts of fabric into one bin and my scraps/leftover fabric into the other bin – turns out that I now have one completely full bin of fabric I already used for previous projects!  That’s something to tackle another time…

Then, I used my pinking shears and cut little square swatches of all of my fabric, stapled them to swatch cards I made and printed out on cardstock, and recorded all of the info I wanted to know/keep track of.  Did I prewash it?  Where did I buy it?  Did I have ideas for a project with this fabric?  I can record all of that info on my cards.

 

Fabric swatch book
 

I ended up dividing my swatches into two different packets, one for woven fabrics and one for knits.  Then, I punched a hole in the upper left-hand corner of each swatch card and used two binder rings to keep them all together.  That’s it!  Now I can flip through and see all of my fabric easily, and I can even throw these in my bag as I head out to the fabric store – very helpful if you’re trying to shop for coordinating fabrics for a project.

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